The Amazons put on a magical show at El Rey Theatre on February 28

Have you ever been to a show that managed to change your outlook on live music? For me, The Amazons’ show at the El Rey Theatre in Los Angeles on February 28th did just that. It was a show that I’d been looking forward to for quite a while, but there was no way I could’ve anticipated exactly how amazing it would be.

The Amazons were on tour this winter opening for Dirty Honey, an LA-based rock band with songs resembling the classic rock of the 70s and 80s. Although I was unable to photograph them as the venue filled up significantly between The Amazons and the headlining set and lacked a photo pit, they were a great and nostalgic high-energy experience.

However, The Amazons. Despite being an opening act with which much of the crowd was unfamiliar, The Amazons managed to effectively win over the entire audience with their driving rock n’ roll anthems, opening with “Fuzzy Tree,” an appropriately (for the name) overdriven track, and continuing with “Mother” and “25”. This moved the crowd into an excitement that made me fear for the safety of my camera more than once while shooting from between the first and fifth rows of people. The Amazons exude the essence of rock, from their warm-toned flashing lights and Matt’s starry suit, to their incredible, driving guitars. It is rare to see a group so incredible at crowd interaction as The Amazons, feeding the excitement of the audience exponentially. I may be biased, as this was the first track I’d heard from them around four years ago, but “Junk Food Forever,” was by far the best of the set, with its easy-to-sing-along-to intro and relatable lyrics detailing the joy of simply being around friends.

Overall, seeing The Amazons live is an unmissable experience that was able to convince me, someone who likely sees over 40 shows a year, that there is something undoubtedly magical about shows like this: shows that re-introduce you to someone you’ve listened to yet never seen, that turn an audience into a party, and that deliver pure unadulterated joy through music.

Meghan Quadracci
Meghan Quadracci is a portrait and music documentary photographer in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. See her work at megquadracci.com.

The Amazons put on a magical show at El Rey Theatre on February 28

Have you ever been to a show that managed to change your outlook on live music? For me, The Amazons’ show at the El Rey Theatre in Los Angeles on February 28th did just that. It was a show that I’d been looking forward to for quite a while, but there was no way I could’ve anticipated exactly how amazing it would be.

The Amazons were on tour this winter opening for Dirty Honey, an LA-based rock band with songs resembling the classic rock of the 70s and 80s. Although I was unable to photograph them as the venue filled up significantly between The Amazons and the headlining set and lacked a photo pit, they were a great and nostalgic high-energy experience.

However, The Amazons. Despite being an opening act with which much of the crowd was unfamiliar, The Amazons managed to effectively win over the entire audience with their driving rock n’ roll anthems, opening with “Fuzzy Tree,” an appropriately (for the name) overdriven track, and continuing with “Mother” and “25”. This moved the crowd into an excitement that made me fear for the safety of my camera more than once while shooting from between the first and fifth rows of people. The Amazons exude the essence of rock, from their warm-toned flashing lights and Matt’s starry suit, to their incredible, driving guitars. It is rare to see a group so incredible at crowd interaction as The Amazons, feeding the excitement of the audience exponentially. I may be biased, as this was the first track I’d heard from them around four years ago, but “Junk Food Forever,” was by far the best of the set, with its easy-to-sing-along-to intro and relatable lyrics detailing the joy of simply being around friends.

Overall, seeing The Amazons live is an unmissable experience that was able to convince me, someone who likely sees over 40 shows a year, that there is something undoubtedly magical about shows like this: shows that re-introduce you to someone you’ve listened to yet never seen, that turn an audience into a party, and that deliver pure unadulterated joy through music.

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