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The Antlers give a delicate and captivating performance of “Hospice” for it’s 10-year anniversary in Brooklyn

The Antlers performance of Hospice at First Unitarian Congregational Society was emotional, haunting and precise, at times so quiet that footsteps of those going up to the balcony for a better view could be heard from the main floor pews. Celebrating the ten-year anniversary of the critically acclaimed album, the Brooklyn-based band reworked an already emotional album to make it even more so, in all the best ways possible.

On the short tour of Hospice shows, Brooklyn was gifted with two sold-out nights, both of which included the album, originally released in March 2009, in its entirety followed by a selection of fan-favorite Antlers songs as an encore. Full setlists for both nights are below.

Timothy Mislock, who also is the band’s touring guitar and bass guitarist, opened both evenings with a short set of rich, atmospheric instrumentals performed on solo electric guitar. The stage was set with rows of candles and although a few fans trickled in during Mislock’s performance, most arrived early to get the best seats in the pews. Following Mislock’s 30-minute show, an announcement came that there would be a 10-minute intermission before the headlining show.

Each show in Brooklyn began with the full ten-song Hospice in full. Fans will know that the album starts faint, with “Prologue” and “Kettering” before a more explosive third track, “Sylvia.” Peter Silberman’s voice was fragile and triumphant, clearly still affected by the emotional nature of the album that he has explained is at least vaguely autobiographical. In addition to Silberman and Mislock, drummer Michael Lerner, equipped with only a snare drum and series of sticks and brushes, also contributed to the captivating live performance.

My favorite moment of the album and of the live show is the back-to-back-to-back trio of “Bear,” “Thirteen” and “Two.” These songs are somewhat fuller than the other parts of the album that are more ambient, and on-stage Silberman’s vocals and the instrumentation elevated them to a new level. Between songs, Silberman shared simple “thank you’s” but said little else. At times, as melodies came to their delicate ends, often with just a single note drawn out until eventual silence, it was the words “thank you” that signaled a song was over and applause could start. Fans were clearly engaged and captivated, much in thanks to the gothic, church setting that made the show feel like much more than just a concert.

Hospice is the kind of album that could be staged as theater, with a diverse tracklist and a storyline that’s just direct enough to be touching without being forced. The decision to perform at First Unitarian was a smart one, and truly made the night stand out as a special experience, compared to if it had simply been at Brooklyn Steel for example.

Silberman’s angelic falsetto was the star of the night on Saturday and Sunday in Brooklyn, and a left a great reminder to re-listen to Hospice in whatever format possible. Recreating the magic of the Brooklyn shows will be difficult, but cuing it up with a good set of speakers is pretty good too.

Timothy Mislock

Setlist: The Antlers at First Unitarian Church, 4/30/2019
Prologue
Kettering
Sylvia
Atrophy
Bear
Thirteen
Two
Shiva
Wake
Epilogue

Encore:
I Don’t Want Love
Drift Dive
Parade
New York
Surrender
Corsicana
Putting the Dog to Sleep

Setlist: The Antlers at First Unitarian Church, 4/31/2019 
Prologue
Kettering
Sylvia
Atrophy
Bear
Thirteen
Two
Shiva
Wake
Epilogue

Encore:
I Don’t Want Love
Drift Dive
Parade
Ahimsa
Surrender
Corsicana
Putting the Dog to Sleep

Brian Benton
Brian is the founder and editor of Respect Your Youngers. He currently lives in New York City, and previously lived in St. Louis and San Francisco. He enjoys public transportation and coffee, and can be found online at brianfbenton.com

The Antlers give a delicate and captivating performance of “Hospice” for it’s 10-year anniversary in Brooklyn

The Antlers performance of Hospice at First Unitarian Congregational Society was emotional, haunting and precise, at times so quiet that footsteps of those going up to the balcony for a better view could be heard from the main floor pews. Celebrating the ten-year anniversary of the critically acclaimed album, the Brooklyn-based band reworked an already emotional album to make it even more so, in all the best ways possible.

On the short tour of Hospice shows, Brooklyn was gifted with two sold-out nights, both of which included the album, originally released in March 2009, in its entirety followed by a selection of fan-favorite Antlers songs as an encore. Full setlists for both nights are below.

Timothy Mislock, who also is the band’s touring guitar and bass guitarist, opened both evenings with a short set of rich, atmospheric instrumentals performed on solo electric guitar. The stage was set with rows of candles and although a few fans trickled in during Mislock’s performance, most arrived early to get the best seats in the pews. Following Mislock’s 30-minute show, an announcement came that there would be a 10-minute intermission before the headlining show.

Each show in Brooklyn began with the full ten-song Hospice in full. Fans will know that the album starts faint, with “Prologue” and “Kettering” before a more explosive third track, “Sylvia.” Peter Silberman’s voice was fragile and triumphant, clearly still affected by the emotional nature of the album that he has explained is at least vaguely autobiographical. In addition to Silberman and Mislock, drummer Michael Lerner, equipped with only a snare drum and series of sticks and brushes, also contributed to the captivating live performance.

My favorite moment of the album and of the live show is the back-to-back-to-back trio of “Bear,” “Thirteen” and “Two.” These songs are somewhat fuller than the other parts of the album that are more ambient, and on-stage Silberman’s vocals and the instrumentation elevated them to a new level. Between songs, Silberman shared simple “thank you’s” but said little else. At times, as melodies came to their delicate ends, often with just a single note drawn out until eventual silence, it was the words “thank you” that signaled a song was over and applause could start. Fans were clearly engaged and captivated, much in thanks to the gothic, church setting that made the show feel like much more than just a concert.

Hospice is the kind of album that could be staged as theater, with a diverse tracklist and a storyline that’s just direct enough to be touching without being forced. The decision to perform at First Unitarian was a smart one, and truly made the night stand out as a special experience, compared to if it had simply been at Brooklyn Steel for example.

Silberman’s angelic falsetto was the star of the night on Saturday and Sunday in Brooklyn, and a left a great reminder to re-listen to Hospice in whatever format possible. Recreating the magic of the Brooklyn shows will be difficult, but cuing it up with a good set of speakers is pretty good too.

Timothy Mislock

Setlist: The Antlers at First Unitarian Church, 4/30/2019
Prologue
Kettering
Sylvia
Atrophy
Bear
Thirteen
Two
Shiva
Wake
Epilogue

Encore:
I Don’t Want Love
Drift Dive
Parade
New York
Surrender
Corsicana
Putting the Dog to Sleep

Setlist: The Antlers at First Unitarian Church, 4/31/2019 
Prologue
Kettering
Sylvia
Atrophy
Bear
Thirteen
Two
Shiva
Wake
Epilogue

Encore:
I Don’t Want Love
Drift Dive
Parade
Ahimsa
Surrender
Corsicana
Putting the Dog to Sleep

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