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Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls awaken Milwaukee as they close out their Be More Kind Tour at the Pabst Theatre

On Saturday October 6, Frank Turner and The Sleeping Souls made their last stop on the US Be More Kind tour, playing the historic Pabst Theatre in Milwaukee. As Turner explained, they had nothing to hold back for the last performance of the tour, a statement supported by the incredible energy of every set.

The show opened with two supporting acts; the first, Sam Coffey and The Iron Lungs, a self described “6 piece rock group from hell”, followed by Bad Cop/Bad Cop, a fiercely feminist punk outfit from Southern California. The latter provided an especially electric presence in the wake of the Kavanaugh hearings, bringing together people of all ages, genders, and backgrounds in a time of anger and fear.

There is no better opening song to describe the compassionate nature of the legend that is Frank Turner than “Be More Kind”, the title track off his most recent record. The crowd listened intently, many singing along and looking excitedly at those near them. A change in light from soft white to bright red led the set from a gentle melody to a series of songs more representative of Frank’s raucous, driving, and all-around joyful punk rock essentiality, beginning with “1933”.

Like the artist himself, audience members from the front pit seats to the back of the third balcony seemed unable to keep from grinning as the show progressed. While rows of theatre seating made a typical open pit impossible, the same sort of energy was present in the dancing and singing of the crowd, bringing strangers together as they smiled and laughed along to every song. Nearing the end of the show, Frank called for everyone in the audience to put their arms around their neighbors, strangers or not, and sway together to the music; if any one moment were to best exemplify the sense of familial unity throughout the night, this was it.

For the last song of the encore, “Polaroid Picture”, the band was joined by both opening acts, with Sam Coffey clutching a miniature Polaroid camera while dressed in a shining jumpsuit. By the end of the night, every tired fan exiting the house wore an exhausted smile while finding their way out with friends or conversing with a new acquaintance. Overall, Frank Turner and The Sleeping Souls were able to bring together a family 1,300 strong, even if only for a night.

Meghan Quadracci
Meghan Quadracci is a portrait and music documentary photographer in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. See her work at megquadracci.com.

Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls awaken Milwaukee as they close out their Be More Kind Tour at the Pabst Theatre

On Saturday October 6, Frank Turner and The Sleeping Souls made their last stop on the US Be More Kind tour, playing the historic Pabst Theatre in Milwaukee. As Turner explained, they had nothing to hold back for the last performance of the tour, a statement supported by the incredible energy of every set.

The show opened with two supporting acts; the first, Sam Coffey and The Iron Lungs, a self described “6 piece rock group from hell”, followed by Bad Cop/Bad Cop, a fiercely feminist punk outfit from Southern California. The latter provided an especially electric presence in the wake of the Kavanaugh hearings, bringing together people of all ages, genders, and backgrounds in a time of anger and fear.

There is no better opening song to describe the compassionate nature of the legend that is Frank Turner than “Be More Kind”, the title track off his most recent record. The crowd listened intently, many singing along and looking excitedly at those near them. A change in light from soft white to bright red led the set from a gentle melody to a series of songs more representative of Frank’s raucous, driving, and all-around joyful punk rock essentiality, beginning with “1933”.

Like the artist himself, audience members from the front pit seats to the back of the third balcony seemed unable to keep from grinning as the show progressed. While rows of theatre seating made a typical open pit impossible, the same sort of energy was present in the dancing and singing of the crowd, bringing strangers together as they smiled and laughed along to every song. Nearing the end of the show, Frank called for everyone in the audience to put their arms around their neighbors, strangers or not, and sway together to the music; if any one moment were to best exemplify the sense of familial unity throughout the night, this was it.

For the last song of the encore, “Polaroid Picture”, the band was joined by both opening acts, with Sam Coffey clutching a miniature Polaroid camera while dressed in a shining jumpsuit. By the end of the night, every tired fan exiting the house wore an exhausted smile while finding their way out with friends or conversing with a new acquaintance. Overall, Frank Turner and The Sleeping Souls were able to bring together a family 1,300 strong, even if only for a night.

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