Even without all of the hits, Sum 41 put on a sweaty, crowd-pleasing show at Terminal 5 in New York (with SuperWhatevr and Seaway)

Deryck Whibley is 38-years-old, but still treats a stage like a teenager would, running and jumping on and off of platforms and rambling on at times like he’s excited to have a microphone and an audience. When his band, Sum 41, got their start it may have been sex, drugs and alcohol fueling the on-stage antics. Now, sober for half a decade, it feels like it’s just the joy of playing shows again.

Touring to celebrate the 15-year anniversary of “Does This Still Look Infected,” Sum 41 was joined at Terminal 5 by Super Whatevr and Seaway. The Costa Mesa, CA-based openers Super Whatevr played the most nuanced show of the night, slightly more melodic than the heavy punk that followed them. They certainly still pack a punk, but frontman Skyler McKee’s slightly high voice puts them in line with bands like Cage The Elephant where thrashing drums are paired with a slight twang.

Seaway’s set was poweful and fun, with a few well-received singalongs of repeatable choruses. They made Saturday night in Manhattan feel like Warped Tour, taking full advantage of on-stage platforms and the wide Terminal 5 stage. Recommended for fans of the classic pop-punk sound from a few years ago.

Sum 41 brought out all the tricks at the start of their show, dropping a large curtain before opening the night with exploding confetti cannons. It was a birthday celebration after all. The show varied from some other recent shows the band has played by leaving out “In Too Deep” and some other non-“Does This Look Infected” favorites. Instead, Whibley led the crowd through a night of short, tight tunes and a handful of covers.

Of course, a cover of “Enter Sandman” was a hit, but it was clear that the crowd was there to hear “Still Waiting,” “The Hell Song,” and the other tracks that defined Sum 41’s sound in the early 2000s. Early in the show, Whibley announced that the band was back in the studio and is planning another tour with new music less summer. If you want to hear some of the band’s other hits, that might be the right place to do it.

What this show did more than anything was prove that Sum 41 is alive and kicking, and hasn’t changed much in over 15 years (mostly in a good way). Whibley loves to talk, sometimes too much, but mostly in a fun and upbeat way that shows he has put a cork in his issues of the past.

Early in the night, he said that the tour wasn’t a celebration of the accomplishment of the band 15 years later, but instead a celebration for fans of an album that (in many cases) was probably a central part of teenage years. The concert truly felt like a party, especially the covers and drum solos making Sum 41 feel like DJs at times.

By the time “Fat Lip” began to close out the encore, the sold-out theatre was sweaty, sometimes shirtless, and sore. Circle pits and crowd-surfers had been going all night and somehow the 3,000 person room felt like a tiny club. The songs 180-seconds of rage wrapped up but as Deryck Whibley and Co. said their goodbyes, it felt more like a see you later. 15 years later, Sum 41 is just getting started.

Sum 41

Sum 41

Sum 41

Sum 41

Sum 41

Sum 41

Sum 41

Sum 41 setlist

Sum 41

Seaway

Seaway

Seaway

Setlist
The Hell Song
My Direction
All Messed Up
A.N.I.C.
Never Wake Up
T.H.T.
Thanks for Nothing
Hyper-Insomnia-Para-Condrioid
Over My Head (Better Off Dead)
No Brains
Mr. Amsterdam
Enter Sandman (Metallica cover)
Drum Solo (Linkin Park medley)
Billy Spleen
Another Brick In The Wall (Pink Floyd)
We Will Rock You (Queen cover)
Still Waiting
Fake My Own Death
Hooch

Encore:
Chuck
No Reason
Walking Disaster
Fat Lip

Brian Benton
Brian is the founder and editor of Respect Your Youngers. He currently lives in New York City, and previously lived in St. Louis and San Francisco. He enjoys public transportation and coffee, and can be found online at brianfbenton.com

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Even without all of the hits, Sum 41 put on a sweaty, crowd-pleasing show at Terminal 5 in New York (with SuperWhatevr and Seaway)

Deryck Whibley is 38-years-old, but still treats a stage like a teenager would, running and jumping on and off of platforms and rambling on at times like he’s excited to have a microphone and an audience. When his band, Sum 41, got their start it may have been sex, drugs and alcohol fueling the on-stage antics. Now, sober for half a decade, it feels like it’s just the joy of playing shows again.

Touring to celebrate the 15-year anniversary of “Does This Still Look Infected,” Sum 41 was joined at Terminal 5 by Super Whatevr and Seaway. The Costa Mesa, CA-based openers Super Whatevr played the most nuanced show of the night, slightly more melodic than the heavy punk that followed them. They certainly still pack a punk, but frontman Skyler McKee’s slightly high voice puts them in line with bands like Cage The Elephant where thrashing drums are paired with a slight twang.

Seaway’s set was poweful and fun, with a few well-received singalongs of repeatable choruses. They made Saturday night in Manhattan feel like Warped Tour, taking full advantage of on-stage platforms and the wide Terminal 5 stage. Recommended for fans of the classic pop-punk sound from a few years ago.

Sum 41 brought out all the tricks at the start of their show, dropping a large curtain before opening the night with exploding confetti cannons. It was a birthday celebration after all. The show varied from some other recent shows the band has played by leaving out “In Too Deep” and some other non-“Does This Look Infected” favorites. Instead, Whibley led the crowd through a night of short, tight tunes and a handful of covers.

Of course, a cover of “Enter Sandman” was a hit, but it was clear that the crowd was there to hear “Still Waiting,” “The Hell Song,” and the other tracks that defined Sum 41’s sound in the early 2000s. Early in the show, Whibley announced that the band was back in the studio and is planning another tour with new music less summer. If you want to hear some of the band’s other hits, that might be the right place to do it.

What this show did more than anything was prove that Sum 41 is alive and kicking, and hasn’t changed much in over 15 years (mostly in a good way). Whibley loves to talk, sometimes too much, but mostly in a fun and upbeat way that shows he has put a cork in his issues of the past.

Early in the night, he said that the tour wasn’t a celebration of the accomplishment of the band 15 years later, but instead a celebration for fans of an album that (in many cases) was probably a central part of teenage years. The concert truly felt like a party, especially the covers and drum solos making Sum 41 feel like DJs at times.

By the time “Fat Lip” began to close out the encore, the sold-out theatre was sweaty, sometimes shirtless, and sore. Circle pits and crowd-surfers had been going all night and somehow the 3,000 person room felt like a tiny club. The songs 180-seconds of rage wrapped up but as Deryck Whibley and Co. said their goodbyes, it felt more like a see you later. 15 years later, Sum 41 is just getting started.

Sum 41

Sum 41

Sum 41

Sum 41

Sum 41

Sum 41

Sum 41

Sum 41 setlist

Sum 41

Seaway

Seaway

Seaway

Setlist
The Hell Song
My Direction
All Messed Up
A.N.I.C.
Never Wake Up
T.H.T.
Thanks for Nothing
Hyper-Insomnia-Para-Condrioid
Over My Head (Better Off Dead)
No Brains
Mr. Amsterdam
Enter Sandman (Metallica cover)
Drum Solo (Linkin Park medley)
Billy Spleen
Another Brick In The Wall (Pink Floyd)
We Will Rock You (Queen cover)
Still Waiting
Fake My Own Death
Hooch

Encore:
Chuck
No Reason
Walking Disaster
Fat Lip

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