Lily Allen sounds sharper, bolder and better than ever at sold-out Music Hall of Williamsburg show

Lily Allen probably was this good in 2008, too. When I was 13 and she was 20, Alright, Still was released to positive reviews and called pop music with a bit of personality. Now, over a decade later, her songs seem sharper, bolder and brasher.

Lily Allen’s new album, her fourth, is No Shame and will be released in June 2018. The album builds off Sheezus, which struggled commercially and with relevancy. Lead single “Hard out Here” also received pushback for it’s controversial video. In advance press for No Shame, Allen has shared that she didn’t connect with the music she had recently been putting out, and the new album clearly goes back to her cheekier roots.

“Trigger Bang” was the first single and features English rapper Giggs. It’s smart and natural, while Sheezus was for the most part neither. Collaborating with Giggs gives Allen a new flare, while “Trigger Bang” sounds just enough like M.I.A.’s “Paper Planes” to still be familiar and catchy.

Allen played a few additional new songs at her sold-out Music Hall of Williamsburg show, including “Higher” and “My One,” a slow jam that both Mark Ronson and Ezra Koenig worked on. She also played “Cake,” a song dedicated to the ladies in the crowd, that clapped back at the patriarchy and double standards.

“Cake” is a new song, but the topics it touches on hardly are for Allen. In fact, she even repackaged “Fuck You” to close out the set as a hate-message to Donald Trump, rather than George Bush. The lyrics still felt frustratingly accurate.

In addition to musical struggles, Allen went through a nasty divorce that she wasn’t afraid to talk about on stage and to say that No Shame and the new Lily Allen is a reversion to the old Lily Allen overlooks how much she’s gone through in the past decade. It’s not a return, it’s a rebirth.

Live dates and album updates are at www.lilyallenmusic.com.

Brian Benton
Brian is the founder and editor of Respect Your Youngers. He currently lives in New York City, and previously lived in St. Louis and San Francisco. He enjoys public transportation and coffee, and can be found online at brianfbenton.com

Lily Allen sounds sharper, bolder and better than ever at sold-out Music Hall of Williamsburg show

Lily Allen probably was this good in 2008, too. When I was 13 and she was 20, Alright, Still was released to positive reviews and called pop music with a bit of personality. Now, over a decade later, her songs seem sharper, bolder and brasher.

Lily Allen’s new album, her fourth, is No Shame and will be released in June 2018. The album builds off Sheezus, which struggled commercially and with relevancy. Lead single “Hard out Here” also received pushback for it’s controversial video. In advance press for No Shame, Allen has shared that she didn’t connect with the music she had recently been putting out, and the new album clearly goes back to her cheekier roots.

“Trigger Bang” was the first single and features English rapper Giggs. It’s smart and natural, while Sheezus was for the most part neither. Collaborating with Giggs gives Allen a new flare, while “Trigger Bang” sounds just enough like M.I.A.’s “Paper Planes” to still be familiar and catchy.

Allen played a few additional new songs at her sold-out Music Hall of Williamsburg show, including “Higher” and “My One,” a slow jam that both Mark Ronson and Ezra Koenig worked on. She also played “Cake,” a song dedicated to the ladies in the crowd, that clapped back at the patriarchy and double standards.

“Cake” is a new song, but the topics it touches on hardly are for Allen. In fact, she even repackaged “Fuck You” to close out the set as a hate-message to Donald Trump, rather than George Bush. The lyrics still felt frustratingly accurate.

In addition to musical struggles, Allen went through a nasty divorce that she wasn’t afraid to talk about on stage and to say that No Shame and the new Lily Allen is a reversion to the old Lily Allen overlooks how much she’s gone through in the past decade. It’s not a return, it’s a rebirth.

Live dates and album updates are at www.lilyallenmusic.com.

Scroll to top