Interview: Smallpools talk songwriting and future plans before a hometown show at The Fonda

It’s been over two years since the release of Smallpools’ debut record, Lovetap!, and they’ve been on the rise ever since. The LA based trio consisting of lead vocalist Sean Scanlon, guitarist Mike Kamerman, and drummer Beau Kuther are currently on tour with Vinyl Theatre supporting Misterwives, and promoting Smallpools’ new EP, The Science of Letting Go. Kamerman describes the EP as “a body of work that’s going to exist together as a standalone entity,” and we decided to dive even deeper into the concept. 

How have things been since the release of The Science of Letting Go?
S – It’s been great. We play most of it on this tour; people seem to care and the reactions have been good.

What was the inspiration going into it?
S – It was very random. We wrote all five songs with five different producers, so it was whatever we were feeling that day. The lyrics come from imagery and personal experiences, and the sounds are our brand mixed with whoever the producer of the day was for that song. We’ve heard the songs a billion times now and it’s all been numb to us so it’s fun to get it out, see people react, and see what their favorites are.

What’s been the main difference with this release compared to Lovetap!?
S – The songs are calmer; we wrote them in a suburb and it just feels different.
M – They’re more complex but also more simple. It sounds stupid, but this EP offers something a little different than what we’ve offered before. When we play the new songs live, it’s a nice change of pace compared to the older material.
S – We’re more mature, could you say?
M – Yeah, our music sits in a similar territory stylistically, and I think these songs branched out a bit and showcased places that our sound could go if we decided to veer in that direction.

Has your perspective on the EP changed after playing it live?
M – After playing it live, you get used to the way it sounds live. I’ll go back and listen to the EP and be like, I was expecting to hear something else in different parts.
B – It’s always evolving.
S – Like, any given day or person is going to make the song sound completely different.

Is there a favorite song to perform?
B – DJs and Porches is a fun one live. It seems to go off pretty well.
S – I like doing Mother — the slower one, but it’s intense at the end. There are a couple of covers we attach onto it so they’re fun.
M – We’ve got different instruments up there too.

What can we expect from Smallpools in the not-so-distant future?
M – We have music that’s finished, and also in the process of being finished.
B – After that we’re looking to tour again. Just the usual shit.

Sammi Hsu

Sammi Hsu is a music photographer based in Southern California. See her work at sam-xcx.com and instagram.com/sam.hs.

Interview: Smallpools talk songwriting and future plans before a hometown show at The Fonda

It’s been over two years since the release of Smallpools’ debut record, Lovetap!, and they’ve been on the rise ever since. The LA based trio consisting of lead vocalist Sean Scanlon, guitarist Mike Kamerman, and drummer Beau Kuther are currently on tour with Vinyl Theatre supporting Misterwives, and promoting Smallpools’ new EP, The Science of Letting Go. Kamerman describes the EP as “a body of work that’s going to exist together as a standalone entity,” and we decided to dive even deeper into the concept. 

How have things been since the release of The Science of Letting Go?
S – It’s been great. We play most of it on this tour; people seem to care and the reactions have been good.

What was the inspiration going into it?
S – It was very random. We wrote all five songs with five different producers, so it was whatever we were feeling that day. The lyrics come from imagery and personal experiences, and the sounds are our brand mixed with whoever the producer of the day was for that song. We’ve heard the songs a billion times now and it’s all been numb to us so it’s fun to get it out, see people react, and see what their favorites are.

What’s been the main difference with this release compared to Lovetap!?
S – The songs are calmer; we wrote them in a suburb and it just feels different.
M – They’re more complex but also more simple. It sounds stupid, but this EP offers something a little different than what we’ve offered before. When we play the new songs live, it’s a nice change of pace compared to the older material.
S – We’re more mature, could you say?
M – Yeah, our music sits in a similar territory stylistically, and I think these songs branched out a bit and showcased places that our sound could go if we decided to veer in that direction.

Has your perspective on the EP changed after playing it live?
M – After playing it live, you get used to the way it sounds live. I’ll go back and listen to the EP and be like, I was expecting to hear something else in different parts.
B – It’s always evolving.
S – Like, any given day or person is going to make the song sound completely different.

Is there a favorite song to perform?
B – DJs and Porches is a fun one live. It seems to go off pretty well.
S – I like doing Mother — the slower one, but it’s intense at the end. There are a couple of covers we attach onto it so they’re fun.
M – We’ve got different instruments up there too.

What can we expect from Smallpools in the not-so-distant future?
M – We have music that’s finished, and also in the process of being finished.
B – After that we’re looking to tour again. Just the usual shit.

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