As their fanbase grows, Flor transform, evolve, and light up venues around the country

It’s a breezy autumn afternoon in Southern California and that, mixed with the sunset in the background, make for the perfect setting to chat with Flor. Comprised of vocalist Zach Grace, guitarist McKinley Kitts, bassist Dylan Bauld, and drummer Kyle Hill, the self-proclaimed “indie pop meets rock” band’s vibrant sound along with their personalities light up a chilly night in Santa Ana, Calif.

But don’t let the exterior fool you; their debut, come out. you’re hiding, is ultimately a positive record sung by a sad person, as Bauld puts it. Keeping the emotions at bay though, Grace wrote the album with a positive atmosphere in mind while still keeping some of those sad undertones to add to the depth that the record needs. “We’re not trying to make people cry out there,” he jokes. Instead, they’re focused on “meeting the listener exactly where they are.” In other words, the goal is to inspire a feeling in general, but not telling the listener exactly how to feel.

The heart of the record, however, is a very closed off and personal journey for Grace; one that later blooms into something greater than himself. “He’ll hole off in his bedroom and write the skeletons of these songs,” Kitts explains. “So it starts as a really personal, private thing and grows and becomes a collaborative effort,” an effort that includes both themselves, as well as the listener.

Collectively, the band agrees that releasing the record was a highlight of Flor’s growing existence. Many of the songs had been finished for years, without being properly released “We wanted people to hear the songs and we wanted them to feel things, understand, and connect,” Grace says — and that’s exactly what happened.

When asked about the musical growth following the release of come out. you’re hiding, the entire band chimes in and jokes that they’ve grown outwards, and “between ten and fifteen pounds,” Kitts says with a laugh. But in all seriousness, as a result of many of the songs from Flor’s Sounds and sights & sounds EPs making it onto the full-length record, Grace explains that any changes or growth hasn’t been all too noticeable for them. “I do hope to have gotten a little bit wiser, found a little more truth in the world, and have been able to translate that into positive messages,” he says.

Nevertheless, the growing process in a technical and individual sense is unending. “As musicians, I think we’ve grown to fit the music,” Hill describes. “I’ve noticed a vast improvement with every band member.” Songs that were originally done in a bedroom or living room were able to be revisited in a proper studio, better instruments, and a fresh outlook.

Flor’s accomplishments are already through the roof (think arena shows with Paramore and successful tours before even having released an album) and the band is far from finished. “We’re on the first step on a long flight of stairs,” Kitts says. After playing major festivals throughout the summer, the band came to an epiphany that the main aspiration for Flor is to become an arena band. “Our music is made for a large setting, and we’ve been writing with that in mind,” he continues.

Although new music may well be in the works, the central focus is still on come out. you’re hiding. The self-written and self-produced record is a shifting embodiment of the band in this very moment. “When inspiration hits, the music comes to life,” Grace explains. “It’s an ongoing process.”

Sammi Hsu

Sammi Hsu is a music photographer based in Southern California. See her work at sam-xcx.com and instagram.com/sam.hs.

As their fanbase grows, Flor transform, evolve, and light up venues around the country

It’s a breezy autumn afternoon in Southern California and that, mixed with the sunset in the background, make for the perfect setting to chat with Flor. Comprised of vocalist Zach Grace, guitarist McKinley Kitts, bassist Dylan Bauld, and drummer Kyle Hill, the self-proclaimed “indie pop meets rock” band’s vibrant sound along with their personalities light up a chilly night in Santa Ana, Calif.

But don’t let the exterior fool you; their debut, come out. you’re hiding, is ultimately a positive record sung by a sad person, as Bauld puts it. Keeping the emotions at bay though, Grace wrote the album with a positive atmosphere in mind while still keeping some of those sad undertones to add to the depth that the record needs. “We’re not trying to make people cry out there,” he jokes. Instead, they’re focused on “meeting the listener exactly where they are.” In other words, the goal is to inspire a feeling in general, but not telling the listener exactly how to feel.

The heart of the record, however, is a very closed off and personal journey for Grace; one that later blooms into something greater than himself. “He’ll hole off in his bedroom and write the skeletons of these songs,” Kitts explains. “So it starts as a really personal, private thing and grows and becomes a collaborative effort,” an effort that includes both themselves, as well as the listener.

Collectively, the band agrees that releasing the record was a highlight of Flor’s growing existence. Many of the songs had been finished for years, without being properly released “We wanted people to hear the songs and we wanted them to feel things, understand, and connect,” Grace says — and that’s exactly what happened.

When asked about the musical growth following the release of come out. you’re hiding, the entire band chimes in and jokes that they’ve grown outwards, and “between ten and fifteen pounds,” Kitts says with a laugh. But in all seriousness, as a result of many of the songs from Flor’s Sounds and sights & sounds EPs making it onto the full-length record, Grace explains that any changes or growth hasn’t been all too noticeable for them. “I do hope to have gotten a little bit wiser, found a little more truth in the world, and have been able to translate that into positive messages,” he says.

Nevertheless, the growing process in a technical and individual sense is unending. “As musicians, I think we’ve grown to fit the music,” Hill describes. “I’ve noticed a vast improvement with every band member.” Songs that were originally done in a bedroom or living room were able to be revisited in a proper studio, better instruments, and a fresh outlook.

Flor’s accomplishments are already through the roof (think arena shows with Paramore and successful tours before even having released an album) and the band is far from finished. “We’re on the first step on a long flight of stairs,” Kitts says. After playing major festivals throughout the summer, the band came to an epiphany that the main aspiration for Flor is to become an arena band. “Our music is made for a large setting, and we’ve been writing with that in mind,” he continues.

Although new music may well be in the works, the central focus is still on come out. you’re hiding. The self-written and self-produced record is a shifting embodiment of the band in this very moment. “When inspiration hits, the music comes to life,” Grace explains. “It’s an ongoing process.”

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