London’s The Big Moon brings smiles and guitar-heavy melodies to Massachusetts

Deep into Tuesday night at the Great Scott in Allston, The Big Moon, of London, England, assembled onstage with huge smiles. Even before the first chord was strummed, fans from a large age range were already lightly bouncing, a zealous energy filling the small venue from the front to the back. This was the second time The Big Moon had played Boston, and many familiar faces adorned the crowd.

The four women let their guitar-heavy melodies rip from their new full-length album, Love in The Fourth Dimension, on the small pub stage. Juliette, the lead singer, delivered endless charisma to the stage and crowd. Her large blonde high ponytail swinging, she jumped into the crowd once or twice to close the gap between her and her audience, even if the audience members were shocked or slightly starstruck.

What I found remarkable throughout the show was the physical and intellectual stamina that The Big Moon retain throughout the show. After they played their songs, the band stayed onstage for the headliner Marika Hackman’s set, since Marika did not have any of her own backing instrumentalists otherwise. As Marika said onstage during her set, “These girls are amazing, doing double shifts onstage every night for three and a half weeks.” The Big Moon also played all the backing instruments in the recording of Marika’s newest album, I’m Not Your Man, so the backing vocals and guitar style in Marika’s songs live sound exactly how they do on the recorded album.

To me, the best part of experiencing The Big Moon’s set is watching the social dynamics between the members. The glances exchanged among the four women make an audience feel in on an inside joke, and the way in which they individually deliver their passion to a crowd is relaxed, well-rehearsed and exciting. Their smiles are continuous and infectious, their effort is apparent, and their energy is seamless. Their casual aura made the show and music feel familiar, even if audience members had never heard the Big Moon’s songs before. All I heard throughout the show from individual crowd members was, “I just want to be friends with them.”

Carter Howe
Carter Howe is a photographer based in Boston. See more of her work at carterhowe.com.

London’s The Big Moon brings smiles and guitar-heavy melodies to Massachusetts

Deep into Tuesday night at the Great Scott in Allston, The Big Moon, of London, England, assembled onstage with huge smiles. Even before the first chord was strummed, fans from a large age range were already lightly bouncing, a zealous energy filling the small venue from the front to the back. This was the second time The Big Moon had played Boston, and many familiar faces adorned the crowd.

The four women let their guitar-heavy melodies rip from their new full-length album, Love in The Fourth Dimension, on the small pub stage. Juliette, the lead singer, delivered endless charisma to the stage and crowd. Her large blonde high ponytail swinging, she jumped into the crowd once or twice to close the gap between her and her audience, even if the audience members were shocked or slightly starstruck.

What I found remarkable throughout the show was the physical and intellectual stamina that The Big Moon retain throughout the show. After they played their songs, the band stayed onstage for the headliner Marika Hackman’s set, since Marika did not have any of her own backing instrumentalists otherwise. As Marika said onstage during her set, “These girls are amazing, doing double shifts onstage every night for three and a half weeks.” The Big Moon also played all the backing instruments in the recording of Marika’s newest album, I’m Not Your Man, so the backing vocals and guitar style in Marika’s songs live sound exactly how they do on the recorded album.

To me, the best part of experiencing The Big Moon’s set is watching the social dynamics between the members. The glances exchanged among the four women make an audience feel in on an inside joke, and the way in which they individually deliver their passion to a crowd is relaxed, well-rehearsed and exciting. Their smiles are continuous and infectious, their effort is apparent, and their energy is seamless. Their casual aura made the show and music feel familiar, even if audience members had never heard the Big Moon’s songs before. All I heard throughout the show from individual crowd members was, “I just want to be friends with them.”

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