Hans Zimmer gives Boston a music spectacle, complete with Pirates of the Caribbean and The Dark Knight songs

Hans Zimmer, arguably the reigning king of the 21st century cinema OST, has taken to the road once more with his “Hans Zimmer Live” show and has proven yet again that he and his orchestra are not to be trifled with. Filling theaters across the globe, roaring through Italy, France, Germany and Ireland, he has landed in North America to show the US what he’s got. And it’s a force to be reckoned with indeed.

Known for soundtracks ranging from the jaunty Pirates of the Caribbean all the way to the downright psychotic The Dark Knight, Hans had no issue drawing a crowd of all ages and backgrounds. Packing a theater the size of the Wang Theater in Boston is no easy feat, but fill every seat he did.

Zimmer took his place on stage at his piano and proceeded to begin a humble intro number that mirrored his humble, unassuming presence on such a large stage. One by one, his front men and women took their place on stage as Zimmer continued playing. Tina Guo, famed cellist and Zimmer Orchestra staple, took her spot with an intense command, followed by drummer and auxiliary percussionist Satnam Ramgotra and multitalented flautist and world music giant Pedro Eustache. One by one, Zimmer’s hand-picked string and brass orchestra took their spots on stage. Just as you think everyone’s been accounted for, and with a very appropriate entrance, a pull of the curtain reveals the final layer of this juggernaut of a live act with his famed choir, known for being the backbone of Zimmer’s composing aesthetic.

From then on it was full speed ahead. Picking off hits from his applauded soundtracks Inception, Pirates of the Caribbean, The Da Vinci Code/Angels and Demons, The Dark Knight and The Lion King – Featuring the colossal vocal talents of Lebo M. (See: the famous Zulu intro of Circle of Life. Yeah, that Lebo M.) An unexpected yet wildly surprising feature indeed. Each hit was slightly rearranged to fit a more rock-centric, giving drummer Ramgotra and several auxiliary percussionist many chances to let their sound break through as only Zimmer can.

Lead guitarist Guthrie Govan took every opportunity to shine as well, coming forward to play lead acoustic guitarist throughout excerpts of 2000’s Gladiator, a complex and layered Zimmer score ripe with middle-eastern inspired strings, lutes and and guitars.

This has been Hans’ first venture throughout the US. I suspect it won’t be his last by a long shot. It was an absolute pleasure seeing this legend live, and I hope against all hope that anyone even remotely interested in cinema scores gets a chance to see Zimmer live in person. The wall of sound he creates with the stroke of his pen has transcended generations, and will continue to reign among the greatest in Hollywood history.

Andy Moran

Andy Moran is a photographer based in Boston. You can find more of his work at www.andymoranphoto.com.

Hans Zimmer gives Boston a music spectacle, complete with Pirates of the Caribbean and The Dark Knight songs

Hans Zimmer, arguably the reigning king of the 21st century cinema OST, has taken to the road once more with his “Hans Zimmer Live” show and has proven yet again that he and his orchestra are not to be trifled with. Filling theaters across the globe, roaring through Italy, France, Germany and Ireland, he has landed in North America to show the US what he’s got. And it’s a force to be reckoned with indeed.

Known for soundtracks ranging from the jaunty Pirates of the Caribbean all the way to the downright psychotic The Dark Knight, Hans had no issue drawing a crowd of all ages and backgrounds. Packing a theater the size of the Wang Theater in Boston is no easy feat, but fill every seat he did.

Zimmer took his place on stage at his piano and proceeded to begin a humble intro number that mirrored his humble, unassuming presence on such a large stage. One by one, his front men and women took their place on stage as Zimmer continued playing. Tina Guo, famed cellist and Zimmer Orchestra staple, took her spot with an intense command, followed by drummer and auxiliary percussionist Satnam Ramgotra and multitalented flautist and world music giant Pedro Eustache. One by one, Zimmer’s hand-picked string and brass orchestra took their spots on stage. Just as you think everyone’s been accounted for, and with a very appropriate entrance, a pull of the curtain reveals the final layer of this juggernaut of a live act with his famed choir, known for being the backbone of Zimmer’s composing aesthetic.

From then on it was full speed ahead. Picking off hits from his applauded soundtracks Inception, Pirates of the Caribbean, The Da Vinci Code/Angels and Demons, The Dark Knight and The Lion King – Featuring the colossal vocal talents of Lebo M. (See: the famous Zulu intro of Circle of Life. Yeah, that Lebo M.) An unexpected yet wildly surprising feature indeed. Each hit was slightly rearranged to fit a more rock-centric, giving drummer Ramgotra and several auxiliary percussionist many chances to let their sound break through as only Zimmer can.

Lead guitarist Guthrie Govan took every opportunity to shine as well, coming forward to play lead acoustic guitarist throughout excerpts of 2000’s Gladiator, a complex and layered Zimmer score ripe with middle-eastern inspired strings, lutes and and guitars.

This has been Hans’ first venture throughout the US. I suspect it won’t be his last by a long shot. It was an absolute pleasure seeing this legend live, and I hope against all hope that anyone even remotely interested in cinema scores gets a chance to see Zimmer live in person. The wall of sound he creates with the stroke of his pen has transcended generations, and will continue to reign among the greatest in Hollywood history.

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