Frankie Rose debuts “Cage Tropical,” a spirited elegy for Los Angeles, at Brooklyn’s Baby’s All Right

Brooklyn’s Baby’s All Right served as a homecoming for Frankie Rose on August 12th. Though Rose was integral to the New York’s lo-fi, dream pop scene, she hoped to retrace her steps where she initially sowed her roots–Los Angeles. After a turbulent 18-months, where Rose found herself in a mire of Dickensian proportions, she returned the scene she helped define, armed with her fourth solo record, “Cage Tropical.”

In an hour set, Rose delivered the sound we anticipated; a deafening fuzz accompanied by an ever-present synth and harmonies so twee it would make Wes Anderson blush. Like her contemporaries, Rose knows how to take a vintage sound we’re all familiar with it and injecting it with a burst of modernity. Leave it to Rose to lovingly reference her influences of her past (the opening track is a small homage to Love and Rockets), while engaging Brooklyn’s Dave Harrington (of Darkside fame) to ensure a natural sheen of experimentation.

As the set closed with “Dyson Sphere,” a dreamy, New Order influenced cut from the new record, it was hard to imagine Rose wasting away in Los Angeles attempting to find the muster to continue making music. We’re glad to have her back.

Eric Han
Eric Han is a NYC-based photographer. See his work at www.kengjuan.net.

Frankie Rose debuts “Cage Tropical,” a spirited elegy for Los Angeles, at Brooklyn’s Baby’s All Right

Brooklyn’s Baby’s All Right served as a homecoming for Frankie Rose on August 12th. Though Rose was integral to the New York’s lo-fi, dream pop scene, she hoped to retrace her steps where she initially sowed her roots–Los Angeles. After a turbulent 18-months, where Rose found herself in a mire of Dickensian proportions, she returned the scene she helped define, armed with her fourth solo record, “Cage Tropical.”

In an hour set, Rose delivered the sound we anticipated; a deafening fuzz accompanied by an ever-present synth and harmonies so twee it would make Wes Anderson blush. Like her contemporaries, Rose knows how to take a vintage sound we’re all familiar with it and injecting it with a burst of modernity. Leave it to Rose to lovingly reference her influences of her past (the opening track is a small homage to Love and Rockets), while engaging Brooklyn’s Dave Harrington (of Darkside fame) to ensure a natural sheen of experimentation.

As the set closed with “Dyson Sphere,” a dreamy, New Order influenced cut from the new record, it was hard to imagine Rose wasting away in Los Angeles attempting to find the muster to continue making music. We’re glad to have her back.

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