Music over matter in local San Francisco showcase featuring Fritz Montana, Mosaics and Locus Pocus

Four bands were billed for Fritz Montana’s album release show at the Independent in San Francisco on Friday night. When the blues-rock trio began considering who would fill those first two spots, they decided that it would be more important to feature bands who they wanted to play with rather than ones who would bring more fans.

“When it came to booking this show, we had the Y-Axis on the bill and needed two other bands,” Fritz Montana drummer Matt Hagarty said before the show. He heard Locus Pocus’s EP after an introduction by mutual friends, and “it was so good, that I said, it doesn’t matter about your social draw, or that no one knows who you are, your EP speaks for itself. And same thing that happened for Locus Pocus happened for Mosaics.”

Mosaics

Mosaics opened the showcase with a visual set featuring their glitch-pop originals, with a Kanye West cover snuck in. The term “glitch” comes from how layering samples into pop music to produce a glitch sound. It’s an official word, according to guitarist Devon Kelts. The background images – called visual-DJing or VJing courtesy of the band’s friend Ian Rust –  added an extra dimension to their acoustic-electronic sound.

 

Mosaics started as a bedroom production of layering samples. “We thought about it visually the way mosaics work as pieces of things that work together to create something that’s defined when you zoom out,” Kelts said. “The idea is that layered samples are like an auditory version of a mosaics. So it’s mosaics of samples.”

Adding singer and pianist Maryam Sadeghian added more songwriting melody and lyricism. The band literally samples the kitchen sink, but they reproduce each song in live performances. Given how dynamic each element is, songs might not come out the same. “The general sketch is there, but every show is different,” bassist Scotty Holdridge said. “You might find something new and take it somewhere different.”

Mosaics will release their second album this year, from which two singles are already available.

Locus Pocus

Locus Pocus, another emerging San Francisco group, followed Mosaics. The band came together within the last year from several graduates of the SF State music program. Since their recent EP, the band has been playing small Bay Area house shows as well as the Red House in the Haight. This was their first venue show.

“Fritz Montana is doing us a huge solid by doing this,” pianist Daniel Markowitz said. “They liked our EP and that’s pretty much it.”

Singer Nate Budroe’s frenetic energy exploded onstage. On keys, Markowitz intuited melodies that were further carried out by guitarist Kyle Chapman’s. On bass, Daniel De Lomier added a smooth counterpoint to Budroe’s energy, and drummer Michael Kipnis led the rhythms.

The quintet has not even existed for a full year. “Kyle and I met like a year ago, got a solid instrumental thing in October, and added Nate in February,” Markowitz said.

Budroe nodded. “Right when I started jamming with them I found an outlet where I could just scream my head off and be a total freak.”

Locus Pocus also received some help from Spotify to publicize their new EP. The second track of the EP, “My Girlfriend Won’t Dance With Me” has over 120,000 plays on Spotify. “It’s kind of a bummer because the way streaming pays artists is kind of a rip,” Budroe said. “At the same time, it’s exposure, and exposure matters, and people buy tickets to shows of bands they like. It feels kind of like a deal with the devil.”

Hagarty was ecstatic after both Mosaics and Locus Pocus’s sets. None of them could wipe off the excitement from their faces.

“If no one ever gave us a chance because they didn’t look at our socials or didn’t appreciate our music we wouldn’t be where we are now,” Hagarty said. “Getting help from other people is exactly how we got to where we are, and we want to help other people. There was no talk of anyone who wasn’t local, it was going to be a local showcase, and that’s what it turned out to be.”

Anna covers shows in DC and San Francisco, and enjoys cartography and bicycling. More of her work can be found at www.annamcgarrigle.com.

Music over matter in local San Francisco showcase featuring Fritz Montana, Mosaics and Locus Pocus

Four bands were billed for Fritz Montana’s album release show at the Independent in San Francisco on Friday night. When the blues-rock trio began considering who would fill those first two spots, they decided that it would be more important to feature bands who they wanted to play with rather than ones who would bring more fans.

“When it came to booking this show, we had the Y-Axis on the bill and needed two other bands,” Fritz Montana drummer Matt Hagarty said before the show. He heard Locus Pocus’s EP after an introduction by mutual friends, and “it was so good, that I said, it doesn’t matter about your social draw, or that no one knows who you are, your EP speaks for itself. And same thing that happened for Locus Pocus happened for Mosaics.”

Mosaics

Mosaics opened the showcase with a visual set featuring their glitch-pop originals, with a Kanye West cover snuck in. The term “glitch” comes from how layering samples into pop music to produce a glitch sound. It’s an official word, according to guitarist Devon Kelts. The background images – called visual-DJing or VJing courtesy of the band’s friend Ian Rust –  added an extra dimension to their acoustic-electronic sound.

 

Mosaics started as a bedroom production of layering samples. “We thought about it visually the way mosaics work as pieces of things that work together to create something that’s defined when you zoom out,” Kelts said. “The idea is that layered samples are like an auditory version of a mosaics. So it’s mosaics of samples.”

Adding singer and pianist Maryam Sadeghian added more songwriting melody and lyricism. The band literally samples the kitchen sink, but they reproduce each song in live performances. Given how dynamic each element is, songs might not come out the same. “The general sketch is there, but every show is different,” bassist Scotty Holdridge said. “You might find something new and take it somewhere different.”

Mosaics will release their second album this year, from which two singles are already available.

Locus Pocus

Locus Pocus, another emerging San Francisco group, followed Mosaics. The band came together within the last year from several graduates of the SF State music program. Since their recent EP, the band has been playing small Bay Area house shows as well as the Red House in the Haight. This was their first venue show.

“Fritz Montana is doing us a huge solid by doing this,” pianist Daniel Markowitz said. “They liked our EP and that’s pretty much it.”

Singer Nate Budroe’s frenetic energy exploded onstage. On keys, Markowitz intuited melodies that were further carried out by guitarist Kyle Chapman’s. On bass, Daniel De Lomier added a smooth counterpoint to Budroe’s energy, and drummer Michael Kipnis led the rhythms.

The quintet has not even existed for a full year. “Kyle and I met like a year ago, got a solid instrumental thing in October, and added Nate in February,” Markowitz said.

Budroe nodded. “Right when I started jamming with them I found an outlet where I could just scream my head off and be a total freak.”

Locus Pocus also received some help from Spotify to publicize their new EP. The second track of the EP, “My Girlfriend Won’t Dance With Me” has over 120,000 plays on Spotify. “It’s kind of a bummer because the way streaming pays artists is kind of a rip,” Budroe said. “At the same time, it’s exposure, and exposure matters, and people buy tickets to shows of bands they like. It feels kind of like a deal with the devil.”

Hagarty was ecstatic after both Mosaics and Locus Pocus’s sets. None of them could wipe off the excitement from their faces.

“If no one ever gave us a chance because they didn’t look at our socials or didn’t appreciate our music we wouldn’t be where we are now,” Hagarty said. “Getting help from other people is exactly how we got to where we are, and we want to help other people. There was no talk of anyone who wasn’t local, it was going to be a local showcase, and that’s what it turned out to be.”

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