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Brit Award winner Laura Marling brings subtle nuance to her lyrics and on-stage persona at Brooklyn Steel

Laura Marling commanded the stage at Brooklyn Steel in the most subtle way possible, much like the subtle command the lyrics of her sixth album in nine years, Semper Femina. The album, and her live show, are polished and utterly straightforward. Quiet and static on a flower-strewn stage in East Williamsburg, Marling truly let her nuanced lyrics do the talking. 

The regularly Mercury Prize-nominated Brit Award winner may not have a hit single, but her well-paced setlist that pulled from her six-album back catalogue certainly pleased the audience. She doesn’t say much throughout the set, but with her Dylan-esque lyrics she doesn’t have to: she divulges so much in her songs. She once told a reporter that she didn’t know how much longer she could go on playing live, because each time she lays herself bare in front of so many people.

Ultimately, you get the feeling that Marling excels most when she’s up there on her own – some songs slump into MOR territory when she’s backed by her bandmates. That said, it felt like she got the balance right tonight, especially by the time she signs off – without an encore, as is customary – with the nearest thing she’s had to a hit single, “Rambling Man.” Semper Femina’s outstanding closer “Nothing, Not Nearly” is carried off with an irresistible swagger, cocky slide lick front and centre.

This show in Brooklyn was the second last of Marling’s current stint of U.S. dates. You can find her music and upcoming shows at www.lauramarling.com.

Brian Benton
Brian is the founder and editor of Respect Your Youngers. He currently lives in New York City, and previously lived in St. Louis and San Francisco. He enjoys public transportation and coffee, and can be found online at brianfbenton.com

Brit Award winner Laura Marling brings subtle nuance to her lyrics and on-stage persona at Brooklyn Steel

Laura Marling commanded the stage at Brooklyn Steel in the most subtle way possible, much like the subtle command the lyrics of her sixth album in nine years, Semper Femina. The album, and her live show, are polished and utterly straightforward. Quiet and static on a flower-strewn stage in East Williamsburg, Marling truly let her nuanced lyrics do the talking. 

The regularly Mercury Prize-nominated Brit Award winner may not have a hit single, but her well-paced setlist that pulled from her six-album back catalogue certainly pleased the audience. She doesn’t say much throughout the set, but with her Dylan-esque lyrics she doesn’t have to: she divulges so much in her songs. She once told a reporter that she didn’t know how much longer she could go on playing live, because each time she lays herself bare in front of so many people.

Ultimately, you get the feeling that Marling excels most when she’s up there on her own – some songs slump into MOR territory when she’s backed by her bandmates. That said, it felt like she got the balance right tonight, especially by the time she signs off – without an encore, as is customary – with the nearest thing she’s had to a hit single, “Rambling Man.” Semper Femina’s outstanding closer “Nothing, Not Nearly” is carried off with an irresistible swagger, cocky slide lick front and centre.

This show in Brooklyn was the second last of Marling’s current stint of U.S. dates. You can find her music and upcoming shows at www.lauramarling.com.

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