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Foals power through electric and captivating set at packed United Palace Theatre

Foals’ photo policy only allowed for photography for the final three songs, which anyone who has shot a show before knows is unusual. Typically, the policy is the first three. Photographers get in and out at the beginning of the set so the front row can enjoy their unobstructed view. When Yannis Philippakis and his Oxford-based quintet burst into their final three songs – “Inhaler”, “What Went Down” and “Two Steps, Twice”, in that order – it was clear why it was those three the band wanted captured. The final fifteen minutes of the show were electric, to say the least.

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Following opening performances by Kiev (polished and poppy) and Bear Hands (charming and off-kilter), Foals took the stage a packed United Palace Theatre in Washington Heights, New York. The venue was unusual, both because it has seats and because it likely took much of the trendy crowd close to an hour to get there. With a capacity of 3,300 people, only a few other theaters in New York would have fit the crowd. Some of the venues you’d expect a rock band to play, like Terminal 5 or The Hammerstein Ballroom, all fall a few hundred spots short. The theatre is ornate and newly restored (thanks Lin-Manuel Miranda!) and after fans realized they could ditch their seats for a pit at the front, things started to heat up.

“My Number”, the fourth song of the set, was an early highlight that kicked things up a notch. Near the middle of the set, “Mountain at My Gates”, resulted in a similar reaction, but neither of those two songs had the same fury as the closing of the set. As the final few of the fifteen songs approached, Philippakis was sweaty and riled up. Along with Walter Gervers (bass), Jack Bevan (percussion), Jimmy Smith (guitar) and Edwin Congreave (keyboards), Philippakis worked hard to gather as many members of the audience near the front of the stage as possible. When he ran down the center aisle of the venue, a visible pack of fans rushed towards the center to reach out and touch the frontman.

foals1
xfoals2

Philippakis signature crowd-surf to close out the set was fairly uncomfortable due to the unusual crowd layout, but as he paced around the stage and eventually hopped atop a stack of speakers, it was clear he hadn’t lost anyone. Foals play a fairly straightforward set of songs every show, and loyal fans knew what was coming when.

I think “Inhaler” was the highlight, just because it’s such a pulsating, ferocious song, but tracks from What Went Down, which was released this year, held their own, too. When the set ended, I would have happily watched the band play another half-hour.

foals3
foals10
foals12
foals14
foals4
foals13

Bear Hands

Bear Hands


Bear Hands

Bear Hands

Brian Benton
Brian is the founder and editor of Respect Your Youngers. He currently lives in New York City, and previously lived in St. Louis and San Francisco. He enjoys public transportation and coffee, and can be found online at brianfbenton.com

Foals power through electric and captivating set at packed United Palace Theatre

Foals’ photo policy only allowed for photography for the final three songs, which anyone who has shot a show before knows is unusual. Typically, the policy is the first three. Photographers get in and out at the beginning of the set so the front row can enjoy their unobstructed view. When Yannis Philippakis and his Oxford-based quintet burst into their final three songs – “Inhaler”, “What Went Down” and “Two Steps, Twice”, in that order – it was clear why it was those three the band wanted captured. The final fifteen minutes of the show were electric, to say the least.

foals7
foals11

Following opening performances by Kiev (polished and poppy) and Bear Hands (charming and off-kilter), Foals took the stage a packed United Palace Theatre in Washington Heights, New York. The venue was unusual, both because it has seats and because it likely took much of the trendy crowd close to an hour to get there. With a capacity of 3,300 people, only a few other theaters in New York would have fit the crowd. Some of the venues you’d expect a rock band to play, like Terminal 5 or The Hammerstein Ballroom, all fall a few hundred spots short. The theatre is ornate and newly restored (thanks Lin-Manuel Miranda!) and after fans realized they could ditch their seats for a pit at the front, things started to heat up.

“My Number”, the fourth song of the set, was an early highlight that kicked things up a notch. Near the middle of the set, “Mountain at My Gates”, resulted in a similar reaction, but neither of those two songs had the same fury as the closing of the set. As the final few of the fifteen songs approached, Philippakis was sweaty and riled up. Along with Walter Gervers (bass), Jack Bevan (percussion), Jimmy Smith (guitar) and Edwin Congreave (keyboards), Philippakis worked hard to gather as many members of the audience near the front of the stage as possible. When he ran down the center aisle of the venue, a visible pack of fans rushed towards the center to reach out and touch the frontman.

foals1
xfoals2

Philippakis signature crowd-surf to close out the set was fairly uncomfortable due to the unusual crowd layout, but as he paced around the stage and eventually hopped atop a stack of speakers, it was clear he hadn’t lost anyone. Foals play a fairly straightforward set of songs every show, and loyal fans knew what was coming when.

I think “Inhaler” was the highlight, just because it’s such a pulsating, ferocious song, but tracks from What Went Down, which was released this year, held their own, too. When the set ended, I would have happily watched the band play another half-hour.

foals3
foals10
foals12
foals14
foals4
foals13

Bear Hands

Bear Hands


Bear Hands

Bear Hands

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